Periodontal disease

The discovery underscores the importance of pregnant women, even those without other risk factors, maintain good oral health.

According to a study by the University of New York in the United States published in the Journal of Dental Research, pregnant women with periodontal disease, teenage a higher risk of developing gestational diabetes, even if they smoke or drink.

The discovery underscores the importance of pregnant women, even those without other risk factors, maintain good oral health.

The study, led by Ananda P. Dasanayake, eliminating smoking and alcohol consumption among a group of 190 pregnant women in Sri Lanka, where a combination of cultural taboos and poverty, preventing women from smoking and drinking.

The findings support an earlier study that found evidence Dasanayake that pregnant women with periodontal disease were more likely to develop gestational diabetes than those with healthy gums.

That study, which followed 256 women with Bellevue Hospital Center in New York in its first six months of pregnancy, showed that 22 of the women developed gestational diabetes. Those women had significantly elevated levels of periodontal bacteria and inflammation compared with the other women in the study.

More than a third of women in the new study, developed over a year, said they had bleeding gums when brushing teeth. The women underwent a dental examination and a blood glucose test, which is used to detect gestational diabetes.

As pointed Dasanayake, women who had the highest amounts of bleeding in your gums also had higher levels of blood glucose. He says he expected the final figures show that between 20 and 30 percent of the women had developed gestational diabetes.

Gestational diabetes is characterized by an inability to transport glucose, the main energy source of the organism to the cells during pregnancy. The condition usually disappears when the pregnancy but women who have had gestational diabetes have an increased risk of later developing the most common form of diabetes, type 2 diabetes.

Besides their potential role in preterm labor, evidence that gum disease may contribute to gestational diabetes suggests that women should see a dentist if they plan to become pregnant and then get it. The treatment of disease gums during pregnancy is safe and effective in improving women’s oral health and minimizes possible risks.